Gardening tips

#21

Beautiful photo, TP, a real wall of colour!!

Our garden is starting to sprout, and the greenery is very welcome. The catnip is growing, and a local ginger cat came and adored the other day, much to Grabbity’s disgust.

On the subject of lawns, a friend of mine introduced me to the concept of a thyme lawn:

Sounds lovely to me. Not sure if it would work in this climate though.

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#22

To be fair, the mint lawn was an accident as the mint spread out of the border and we’ve just let it. Plus you can’t walk on it so I don’t know if it counts as a lawn in the technical sense.

Oh, I’m totally trying that! I’ve got part of the lawn as wildflowers where I can only walk through with care and other parts where it’s proper grass to walk (and lie) on. The wildflower part is getting bigger all the time - one new plant at a time! I will be keeping an eye out for Thymus serpyllum at Malvern flower show next week.

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#23

Wildflower meadow made in heaven. Complete with antique apple trees and genuine historic ruins (no follies here thanks very much!).

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#24

Oh, that’s gorgeous! I miss places like that!

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#25

And this? Henley, just set back from the river a few metres. Wisteria to die for!

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#26

Oh, that is gorgeous!! I love wisteria, it’s so charming!

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#27

And our own vanilla-scented clematis montana in all its magnificence. It is more than 20 years old.

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#28

The apple trees, cherry tree and pear tree here are in full bloom. The recent wind has blown blossom off which is like snow on the grass. I took some photos today but need to get around to uploading them. Didn’t take any of the “blossom snow” so should probably try to do that tomorrow!

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#29

My fruit trees are in flower too and it’s beautiful. My cherry is just going over but my apple and crabapple are op fully out and my medlar is just starting. They’re all quite small trees (only the cherry and the medlar are taller than me) so no carpets of blossom yet. But give it time!

It’s Malvern flower show today and I’m off to buy my new herb garden. I’m so excited! Hopefully the weather will be nice (well, not rain) and there’ll be lots to buy. We’re aiming to get there for 10am so we’ll have lots of time to explore.

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#30

Oh, I meant to say, TP those flowers are beautiful!!!

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#31

More to come. First oriental poppy of the year in my garden. A really vivid orange!

And the final lot of tulips to come into bloom. I love purple!

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#32

Ohhh, beautiful!

I had a very successful visit to Malvern. I now have a new proper rosemary, a prostrate rosemary, a proper sage, a tricolour sage, a creeping thyme (thanks Suw!), a variegated thyme, a peppermint, an alpine strawberry and some other herbs I can’t remember (oh, I also got two scented pelargoniums - a lemon scented one whose name I don’t know and “Attar of Roses” which smells divine). I also bought a new carnivorous plant, my first butterwort.

I’ll be pulling out the herb garden over the next few evening and then it will be ready to plant up with the new stuff. Yay!

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#33

Wow, that is a huge haul!! Though I did read that as “a prostate rosemary” and was very confused for a moment!!

Our garden has suddenly grown an awful lot, so we have greenery everywhere. And the first fresh catnip of the year for the kittehs! They ate it down and got suitably stoned and demanded food. Ha ha ha.

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#34

I have an outbreak of alpine strawberries, and never planted a single one. I reckon a passing bird must have ‘deposited’ some seeds! Which was generous and much appreciated.

Other free plants this year, grown from wind-blown seed, a stunning Jacob’s Ladder and several promising opium poppies. Gardening on a windy corner plot, we do rather well with freebies blown down the street from our neighbours’ gardens.

You really did get a terrific haul there from the flower show! I’ll leave as a parting shot, my first Dutch Iris of the year. The background is messy because as a tribute to my suburban environment, I planted a pink pampas grass a while back…which is now wild and huge!

TP

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#35

Lovely!

I have realised that hostas are poisonous to cats, so they are going to have to come out. Which basically nukes 90% of our garden. Bah. Really thinking about getting a professional in to do a bit of work to get things moving. We have too much to do in the house to be able to totally redo the garden too.

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#36

From the minimal googling I’ve done it seems that a lot of garden plants are poisonous to cats yet they seem to survive pretty well so I’d hold fire and see if there’s any evidence that your cats are tempted to eat them before you go digging them all up. I’m not saying that you should risk having them poisoned, and if the fear is keeping you awake then do what’s best to calm your nerves, but gardens can have poisonous things and still be pretty safe places for pets. One list I saw mentioned hyacinths yet I’ve definitely had cats come into my garden while my hyacinths were in bloom and I’ve not heard of any dying (and they’re still crapping all over the place :angry:). So it may be that while these things are poisonous, you have to have a cat who’s willing to endanger itself to be a problem. Not having had cats I don’t know if this is something they do so use your best judgement, just don’t do anything hasty.

Oh, and if you can afford it I’d definitely get someone in to do the garden. Just make sure they know what they’re doing and have a clear idea of what you want to achieve. Good luck!

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#37

Mewton will eat anything, and although they are not allowed out unless they are in a harness and on a lead, he has already tried to eat the hostas. I had to physically carry him off. He’s a lovely cat, but he’s not very smart.

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#38

Fair enough. There’s nothing that can be done if they’re determined to poison themselves! Hux went through a couple of weeks (which were also his first couple of weeks) as a puppy trying to eat everything poisonous in my garden. I didn’t realise I had so much, but he found some earthballs which I didn’t even realise were in the garden! He also tried eating the rhubarb and the fruit from my potatoes! The earthball had me getting the vets to call the poison hotline as he decided that the afternoon he ate it was going to be the very same afternoon, just by chance, that he’d actually have a daytime nap for the first time since I got him and one of the symptoms was lethargy!

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#39

Oh dear!! That does sound rather traumatic!

Both our cats have eating-things-they-shouldn’t problems. With Grabbity it’s plastic. With Mewton it’s ribbon (!!) and plants. I wonder if it’s a form of wooleating, because it’s just as intractable.

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#40

I think I must be pretty fortunate that Lottie and Emms are only interested in eating grass (of which there is plenty!) You all have such beautiful gardens or adventurous gardening plans. I am not a gardener, though I can appreciate the beauty and effort in gardens. I am afraid my garden is a very large area of grass with some trees in it. It suits me perfectly as I love grass and trees :slight_smile: There is a “rockery” next to the pond where mum (who does like to garden) has planted some nice traily purple stuff (and other things) and I want to plant a load of catnip for the cats :smiley:

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