Oxford University's 'women in the humanities' group tackling sexism in academia

#1

Not sure if this has been posted…


http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/feb/24/sexism-women-in-university-academics-feminism?CMP=share_btn_tw

Comments worth reading!


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#2

Hey TP, this is an interesting article - I’ve edited the title just to make it a little clearer, hope you don’t mind.


eniphaest :slight_smile:
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#3

Cool!

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#4

I feel like logging in to the comments and simply posting this link: 


http://www.cracked.com/blog/8-a242423oles-who-show-up-every-time-word-feminism-used/
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#5

Though I did learn about sealioning: 


http://simplikation.com/why-sealioning-is-bad/
http://wondermark.com/1k62
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#6

I just can’t read the comments on the guardian sometimes, especially under any article that relates to feminism. They make me so angry, and I’m a fairly angry person anyway!


That sealioning thing is great - very funny.
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#7

I read the article when someone linked it on FB, but I did not read the comments. I think I made a wise choice there!!

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#8

I too am avoiding the comments, and will do so until they stop justifying Lewis’ Law.

The article itself was really interesting. I like that it pointed out that many of the people acting in sexist ways are those who are supposed to be ‘enlightened’.

These were younger men, who’d grown up since the 1970s: wasn’t misogyny meant to disappear when they came of age? Yet, as I watched our next generation of professors perform, it was as if feminism had never happened.

It often feels like a lot of sexism is dismissed as people who ‘just don’t know any better’ but it’s not. It’s people who have been so immersed in our sexist culture that they don’t notice that they are being sexist. Slapping bums and calling colleagues ‘love’ may have ended and I think because it has (largely) many people think that there’s nothing to worry about. But while the obvious examples of sexism have been removed, the more insidious examples remain and because they’re more subtle they are harder to call out (or even notice if you aren’t looking for them).
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